Australia news live update: Albanian government to outline position on minimum wage increase | Australia news

good morning,

It’s Friday! We’ve almost made it!

Caitlin Cassidy With you this morning to guide you through today’s news, starting with the minimum wage.

The Albanian government is due to hand down its minimum wage submission to the Fair Work Commission Today, after endorsing a pay rise of 5.1% to keep up with inflation during the election campaign.

The commission is carrying out its annual review determining whether the minimum wage of $20.33 per hour should be raised, a decision that will effect around 3 million Australians.

Albanese said his decision would be “consistent” with his position throughout the campaign.

Meanwhile, the Queen will miss the national service of thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral in London today after experiencing “some discomfort” during Thursday’s platinum jubilee celebrations, Buckingham Palace has said.

In a speech marking the Queen’s platinum jubilee, the prime minister declared Australia’s relationship with Britain is now one of “equals” rather than “parent and upstart”, while acknowledging the monarch has been an “enduring and inspiring” presence for the nation.

And as climate change returns to the forefront of the national conservation amid rising energy prices, almost half of the planet’s land surface needs extra conservation protection if the biodiversity crisis is to be halted, a major new study has found.

Let’s dive in.

Peter Hannam

‘All options on the table’ when it comes to gas supply

Lots of chatter in the media this morning about reserving some of Australia’s gas production in the country’s east for “domestic use” rather than exports.

WA retains 15% of gas produced in that state, and new resources minister Madeleine King is reported as saying “all options are on the table”.

That may well be the case but it will be a complicated thing to implement for the Albanian and other governments, as is examined in this explainer of what’s going on:

Queensland has a policy of reserving some of the new acreage (hectare-age?) for domestic use as it is. Appeathe industry group, notes Victorian gas from Bass Strait has no direct export route (though a lot of it is piped out the state), and NSW’s main gas project – Santos’s Narrabri venture – is intended for use in that state. (Let’s see.)

Meanwhile, wholesale power prices are again high in the spot market this morning, according to PocketNEME:

As eastern Australia wakes up, wholesale prices are also on the rise. @reddolphinsys pic.twitter.com/PWNWs3gB3p

— Peter Hannam (@p_hannam) June 2, 2022

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The high prices (the March quarter averaged $87 per megawatt across the national electricity market) came even after the Australian Energy Market Operator declared a potential gas shortage in Victoria had been “resolved”.

From @AEMO_Energy at about 930pm, AEST, last night. pic.twitter.com/s5IcRHMNxC

— Peter Hannam (@p_hannam) June 2, 2022

n”,”url”:”https://twitter.com/p_hannam/status/1532474089272901632?s=20&t=rgcuDj2geCk6wljnQbBZJw”,”id”:”1532474089272901632″,”hasMedia”:false,”role”:”inline”,”isThirdPartyTracking”:false,”source”:”Twitter”,”elementId”:”a693003e-7c05-4b0d-931c-0ece94c361ab”}}”/>

Now, spot wholesale prices don’t tell you what will happen for most of our power bills. Generation costs can be as little as a quarter of household electricity bills, with networks and retailing taking up most of the rest. Still, standard offers are going to rise by as much as 18% from July, the Australian Energy Regulator said last month.

Smaller retailers, though, are already struggling to cope with soaring energy costs and their ability to pass them on to customers. More of them are preparing to tell their customers to find other suppliers, or face steeply higher charges, by the looks.

Currently we see 24 retailers have removed their market offers in NSW and QLD. Some of these are hedged but getting swamped with new customers and need to limit growth to the hedging cover they have. For those 5-10 asking existing customers to leave, the future looks bleak.

— WATTever Australia (@watteverAus) June 2, 2022

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Currently we see 24 retailers have removed their market offers in NSW and QLD. Some of these are hedging but getting swamped with new customers and need to limit growth to the hedging cover they have. For those 5-10 asking existing customers to leave, the future looks bleak.

— WATTever Australia (@watteverAus) June 2, 2022

10 years since Mabo

Today marks the 30th anniversary of the historic Mabo decision, when the fiction of Terra Nullius was overturned in Australia.

Queensland’s minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander partnerships Craig Crawford praised Eddie Koiki Mabo’s pursuit to recognise his lands on the island of Mer in the Torres Strait.

For ten years, Eddie Koiki Mabo pursued a case in the High Court of Australia to establish legal recognition of his family’s ownership of their lands on the island of Mer in the Torres Strait.

Ultimately, his claim was successful when on 3 June 1992, the High Court ruled in his favour, though sadly he did not live to see the result of his advocacy.

Significantly it dispelled a myth, acknowledged the truth of the nation’s history, gave us native title laws, and inspires us all to embrace reconciliation.

30 years ago Mr Eddie 'Koiki' Mabo is a constant reminder that connection to country is real, thank you for helping us to learn, fight and grow xx pic.twitter.com/27xVTlFXgz

— Troy Cassar-Daley (@troycassardaley) June 2, 2022

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30 years ago Mr Eddie ‘Koiki’ Mabo is a constant reminder that connection to country is real, thank you for helping us to learn, fight and grow xx pic.twitter.com/27xVTlFXgz

— Troy Cassar-Daley (@troycassardaley) June 2, 2022

In 1990, a judge determined Mabo had no claim of inheritance on the land he had grown up on, as he hadn’t been formally adopted under Queensland law by his uncle.

His mother died shortly after he was born, and he was raised by his uncle Benny Mabo under Ailan Kastom (Torres Strait Island custom) child rearing practice.

Under Queensland laws these children’s legal identities didn’t align with their cultural and family identities. The practice, Meriba Omasker Kaziw Kazipa, which means “for our children’s children”, became law in Queensland last year.

Wong: no ‘loudhailer’ diplomacy on Assange

Now to Julian Assangewho remains incarcerated and is facing a string of espionage charges in the US.

Asked if the Labor government will go harder on pushing for his freedom, Wong replies:

The prime minister has expressed … a view that it’s time for the case to be brought to an end.

The Australian government under both parties has consistently raised the issues with Mr Assange and his arrest in the US and the UK.

[The prime minister said] not all foreign affairs is best done with the loudhailer and … I would be taking that advice.

Wong on China trade relationship

Turning more broadly to China, Wong is asked if it is possible for Australia to improve its relationship with Beijing.

She says the government has an interest in a world where trade and economic engagement is free.

The concern Australia has raised about the Chinese economic measures against Australia, is that they affirm that principle.

Beijing has said it wants to improve its relationship with Australia – is that still possible?

“We have an interest in a world where trade and economic engagement is open and free and is predicated on norms and rules”

@SenatorWong (PART 1)

— RN Breakfast (@RNBreakfast) June 2, 2022

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Beijing has said it wants to improve its relationship with Australia – is that still possible?

“We have an interest in a world where trade and economic engagement is open and free and is predicated on norms and rules”

@SenatorWong (PART 1)

— RN Breakfast (@RNBreakfast) June 2, 2022

Beijing says the detention of Australian’s Cheng Lei and Yang Hengjun shouldn’t be an issue. “How concerned are you about them?”

Wong:

I am concerned by any Australian citizen who is incarcerated.

I understand from the department that we’ve continued to seek consular access in accordance with the agreement with China. There have been some issued raised … we continue to advocate publicly for Miss Cheng to be treated appropriately.

Are you expecting more trade sanctions for Australia given your intervention in the Pacific?

“we will do what we think is right.. bearing in mind we are part of the Pacific family”

@SenatorWong, Foreign Minister

— RN Breakfast (@RNBreakfast) June 2, 2022

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Are you expecting more trade sanctions for Australia given your intervention in the Pacific?

“we will do what we think is right.. bearing in mind we are part of the Pacific family”

@SenatorWongForeign Minister

— RN Breakfast (@RNBreakfast) June 2, 2022

Wong asked if China PNG visit is political interference

China’s foreign minister Wang Yi is in Papua New Guinea today during the nation’s election campaign. Asked if this amounted to political interference, Wong replied:

I point to the decision by the Australian government to respect the indication from PNG and advice we’ve been given that it is not an appropriate time simply to visit during an election campaign.

What we’re seeing is China being much more active in the region … that’s been confirmed by what the Chinese government has said. What we have to do is lift our engagement in the region, talk to them, with them about our climate policy which is an essential issue for many Pacific island nations.

We have to do more work than has previously been done in the region, that’s what the next few years look like.

Penny Wong continues Pacific tour

foreign minister Penny Wong is in Tonga this morning, in her second visit to the Pacific in a week.

She spoke with Radio National this morning, reiterating Australia will continue to work with the Pacific family as a national priority.

This is about the Australian government reaching out to the Pacific, we said in the election we would bring new energy, more resources to the Pacific, we said we would be much more ambitious on climate.

Regional security should be dealt with by the Pacific family of which Australia is a part.

China's Foreign Minister is coming to the end of his Pacific tour – Who's going to come away happier?

“this is about the Australian government on behalf of Australia reaching out to the Pacific..”

@SenatorWong, Foreign Minister (PART 1)

— RN Breakfast (@RNBreakfast) June 2, 2022

n”,”url”:”https://twitter.com/RNBreakfast/status/1532475243993780224″,”id”:”1532475243993780224″,”hasMedia”:false,”role”:”inline”,”isThirdPartyTracking”:false,”source”:”Twitter”,”elementId”:”7c0e705c-be3d-4930-892c-3b6e2d8b2674″}}”>

China’s Foreign Minister is coming to the end of his Pacific tour – Who’s going to come away happier?

“This is about the Australian government on behalf of Australia reaching out to the Pacific..”

@SenatorWongForeign Minister (PART 1)

— RN Breakfast (@RNBreakfast) June 2, 2022

Albanian platinum jubilee speech

The prime minister Anthony Albanian marked the Queen’s platinum jubilee yesterday evening as ACT buildings were lit up in purple.

In a speech, Albanese said Australia’s relationship with the colonial power “is no longer what it was at the dawn of [Queen Elizabeth’s] reign”.

No longer parent and young upstart, we stand as equals. More importantly, we stand as friends.

Albanese also praised the Queen as a “a rare constant, an enduring, inspiring … presence of calm, decency and strength”, noting that during the past 184 years, the throne has been held by women for 133 of them.

Unlike her forebears Princess Elizabeth did not choose a new name for herself as monarch. There was no question that she would retain the name that she had for all of her life. Already she was giving a sign of the stability and continuity she would provide, and indeed the continuity that royal women have provided.

Australian Parliament House and landmarks are lit up purple during a celebration marking the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee. Photograph: Tracey Nearmy/Getty Images
Parliament House in Canberra is illuminated in purple as part of celebrations for the Queen's Platinum Jubilee last night.
Parliament House in Canberra is illuminated in purple as part of celebrations for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee last night. Photograph: Mike Bowers/The Guardian

It comes as assistant minister for the republic Matt Thistlethwaite says the work done over the next three years will ensure the country is “ready to go in a second term of an Albanian government”.

good morning,

It’s Friday! We’ve almost made it!

Caitlin Cassidy With you this morning to guide you through today’s news, starting with the minimum wage.

The Albanian government is due to hand down its minimum wage submission to the Fair Work Commission Today, after endorsing a pay rise of 5.1% to keep up with inflation during the election campaign.

The commission is carrying out its annual review determining whether the minimum wage of $20.33 per hour should be raised, a decision that will effect around 3 million Australians.

Albanese said his decision would be “consistent” with his position throughout the campaign.

Meanwhile, the Queen will miss the national service of thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral in London today after experiencing “some discomfort” during Thursday’s platinum jubilee celebrations, Buckingham Palace has said.

In a speech marking the Queen’s platinum jubilee, the prime minister declared Australia’s relationship with Britain is now one of “equals” rather than “parent and upstart”, while acknowledging the monarch has been an “enduring and inspiring” presence for the nation.

And as climate change returns to the forefront of the national conservation amid rising energy prices, almost half of the planet’s land surface needs extra conservation protection if the biodiversity crisis is to be halted, a major new study has found.

Let’s dive in.

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